8. Rolfe and Derwent -

They journey. And, as heretofore,
Derwent invoked his spirits bright
Against the wilds expanding more:
" Do but regard yon Islamite
And horse: equipments be but lean,
Nor less the nature still is rife —
Mettle, you see, mettle and mien.
Methinks fair lesson here we glean:
The inherent vigour of man's life
Transmitted from strong Adam down,
Takes no infirmity that 's won
By institutions — which, indeed,
Be as equipments of the breed.
God bless the marrow in the bone!
What 's Islam now? does Turkey thrive?
Yet Islamite and Turk they wive
And flourish, and the world goes on."
" Ay. But all qualities of race
Which make renown — these yet may die,
While leaving unimpaired in grace
The virile power," was Rolfe's reply;
" For witness here I cite a Greek —
God bless him! who tricked me of late
In Argos. What a perfect beak
In contour — oh, 'twas delicate;
And hero-symmetry of limb:
Clownish I looked by side of him.
Oh, but it does one's ardour damp —
That splendid instrument, a scamp!
These Greeks indeed they wear the kilt
Bravely; they skim their lucid seas;
But, prithee, where is Pericles?
Plato is where? Simonides?
No, friend: much good wine has been spilt:
The rank world prospers; but, alack!
Eden nor Athens shall come back: —
And what's become of Arcady?"
He paused; then in another key:
" Prone, prone are era, man and nation
To slide into a degradation!
With some, to age is that — but that."

" Pathetic grow'st thou," Derwent said:
And lightly, as in leafy glade,
Lightly he in the saddle sat.
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