Act II. Scene II. The Same.

[Enter Segasto, and the Clown with weapons
about him.]

SEGASTO.
Tell me, sirra, how do you like your weapons?

MOUSE.
O very well, very well, they keep my sides warm.

SEGASTO.
They keep the dogs from your shins very well,
do they not?

MOUSE.
How, keep the dogs from my shins? I would
scorn but my shins should keep the dogs from them.

SEGASTO.
Well, sirra, leaving idle talk, tell me:
Dost thou know captain Tremelio's chamber?

MOUSE.
Aye, very well; it hath a door.

SEGASTO.
I think so, for so hath every chamber.
But does thou know the man?

MOUSE.
Aye, forsooth, he hath a nose on his face.

SEGASTO.
Why so hath every one.

MOUSE.
That's more than I know.

SEGASTO.
But doest thou remember the captain, that was
here with the king even now, that brought the
young prince prisoner?

MOUSE.
O, very well.

SEGASTO.
Go unto him and bid him come to me. Tell him
I have a matter in secret to impart to him.

MOUSE.
I will, master:--master, what's his name?

SEGASTO.
Why, captain Tremelio.

MOUSE.
O, the meal man. I know him very well. He
brings meal every Saturday. But hark you, master,
must I bid him come to you or must you come to
him?

SEGASTO.
No, sir, he must come to me.

MOUSE.
Hark you, master, how if he be not at home? What
shall I do then?

SEGASTO.
Why, then thou leavest word with some of his folks.

MOUSE.
Oh, master, if there be no body within, I will leave
word with his dog.

SEGASTO.
Why, can his dog speak?


MOUSE.
I cannot tell; wherefore doth he keep his chamber else?

SEGASTO.
To keep out such knaves as thou art.

MOUSE.
Nay, be lady, then go your self.

SEGASTO.
You will go, sir, will ye not?

MOUSE.
Yes, marry, will I. O tis come to my head:
And a be not within, I'll bring his chamber to you.

SEGASTO.
What, wilt thou pluck down the King's house?

MOUSE.
Nay, be lady, I'll know the price of it first. Master,
it is such a hard name, I have forgotten it again. I
pray you, tell me his name.

SEGASTO.
I tell thee, captain Tremelio.

MOUSE.
Oh, captain treble knave, captain treble knave.

[Enter Tremelio.]

TREMELIO.
How now, sirra, doost thou call me?

MOUSE.
You must come to my master, captain treble knave.

TREMELIO.
My Lord Segasto, did you send for me?

SEGASTO.
I did, Tremelio. Sirra, about your business.

MOUSE.
Aye, marry: what's that, can you tell?

SEGASTO.
No, not well.

MOUSE.
Marry, then, I can: straight to the kitchen dresser,
to John the cook, and get me a good piece of beef
and brewis, and then to the buttery hatch to Thomas
the butler for a jack of beer, and there for an hour
I'll so be labour my self! therefore, I pray you, call
me not till you think I have done, I pray you, good
master.

SEGASTO.
Well, sir, away.

[Exit Mouse.]

Tremelio, this it is: thou knowest the valour of
Segasto spread through all the kingdom of Arragon,
and such as hath found triumph and favours, never
daunted at any time; but now a shepherd is admired
at in court for worthiness, and Segasto's honour laid
a side. My will, therefore, is this, that thou dost find
some means to work the shepherd's death. I know
thy strength sufficient to perform my desire, & thy
love no other wise than to revenge my injuries.

TREMELIO.
It is not the frowns of a shepherd that Tremelio fears.
Therefore, account it accomplished, what I take in hand.

SEGASTO.
Thanks, good Tremelio, and assure they self,
What I promise that will I perform.

TREMELIO.
Thanks, my good Lord, and in good time see where
He cometh: stand by a while, and you shall see
Me put in practise your intended drifts.
Have at thee, swain, if that I hit thee right.

[Enter Mucedorus.]

MUCEDORUS.
Viled coward, so without cause to strike a man.
Turn, coward, turn; now strike and do thy worst.

[Mucedorus killeth him.]

SEGASTO.
Hold, shepherd, hold; spare him, kill him not!
Accursed villain, tell me, what hast thou done?
Ah, Tremelio, trusty Tremelio!
I sorrow for thy death, and since that thou,
Living, didst prove faithful to Segasto,
So Segasto now, living, shall honour
The dead corpse of Tremelio with revenge.
Bloodthirsty villain,
Born and bred to merciless murther,
Tell me, how durst thou be so bold at once
To lay thy hands upon the least of mine?
Assure thy self,
Thou shalt be used according to the law.

MUCEDORUS.
Segasto, cease, these threats are needless.
Accuse not me of murther, that have done
Nothing but in mine own defence.

SEGASTO.
Nay, shepherd, reason not with me.
I'll manifest thy fact unto the King,
Whose doom will be thy death, as thou deservest.
What ho, Mouse, come away!

[Enter Mouse.]

MOUSE.
Why how now, what's the matter?
I thought you would be calling before I had done.

SEGASTO.
Come, help; away with my friend.

MOUSE.
Why, is he drunk? cannot he stand on his feet?

SEGASTO.
No, he is not drunk, he is slain.

MOUSE.
Flaine? no, by Lady, he is not flaine.

SEGASTO.
He's killed, I tell thee.

MOUSE.
What, do you use to kill your friends?
I will serve you no longer.

SEGASTO.
I tell thee, the shepherd killed him.

MOUSE.
O, did a so? but, master, I will have all his
apparel if I carry him away.

SEGASTO.
Why, so thou shalt.

MOUSE.
Come, then, I will help; mas, master, I think
his mother song looby to him, he is so heavy.

[Exeunt Segasto and Mouse.]

MUCEDORUS.
Behold the fickle state of man, always mutable,
Never at one. Sometimes we feed on fancies
With the sweet of our desires; sometimes again
We feel the heat of extreme misery.
Now am I in favour about the court and country.
To morrow those favours will turn to frowns:
To day I live revenged on my foe,
To morrow I die, my foe revenged on me.

[Exit.]
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