To C.G. Esq. By Way of His Praise of My Vers de Societe'

BY WAY OF THANKS FOR HIS PRAISE OF MY VERS DE SOCIETE .

THE MOUSE AND THE RAT .

A Mouse one day, in frolic chat,
Was tickled by a cunning Rat ,
Whose tail and whiskers (dress'd at Court)
The Mouse would pull in rustic sport.
" My little Play-fellow, " said he,
" You nibble corn as well as me;
Your tail is long, your neck is fat —
Sure you were born to be a Rat .
That hole deserves a Nation's thanks;
Come, share with me the River's banks!
It rather seems for Mice a whim —
But I 've no doubt that you could swim . "
The Mouse , though vain as Mouse could be,
With both his eyes began to see;
His Judge despairing to recover,
Smoak'd the fine speeches of his Lover .
" My Lord , " said Mus , " you'd court me well,
If I had any votes to sell ;
With grace your tongue its arms can wield,
You are of Rats the Chesterfield ;
Perhaps the mischief 's in your head
Of Nell in Lady Love-rule's bed;
Or you intend the silly jay
In borrow'd plumage to array;
Or, as the corn-provision 's dear,
Have thoughts of snipping off an ear:
Or you may turn King's Evidence ,
And save your neck at my expence:
Denounce me at Grimalkin's forum ,
And lay the Felon-mouse before 'em;
I 'm told (but that is by the bye)
That you 're a Ministerial Spy.
I am a poor insolvent Mouse,
And Rats desert the falling house.
But now I see what you 'd be at —
In other words, I smell a Rat .
Armidas with Rinaldos play:
But Mice are Prudes , and run away.
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