A Matrimonial Dialogue

WRITTEN ON THE WIFE'S BIRTH-DAY .

LOVE .

In tears, addressing the Husband and the Wife .

 W AS ever Infant so deceiv'd?
'Tis what I could n't have believ'd.

HUSBAND .

Can you , my dear, the cause explain,
Why Cupid should of us complain?

WIFE .

Alas!—not I—what he requires,
He does not ask —but he inspires .

HUSBAND .

Come, tell us why those frowns appear?
And what's the fountain of the tear?

LOVE .

Have I not reason?—Pray was this
Our compact in the nuptial bliss?
That here, for Man and Wife detain'd,
My arms and wings are to be chain'd;
If I attended at the wedding,
And was a party in the bedding,
'Tis all that either could expect—
The world complains of my neglect.
What more attendance must I give?

HUSBAND .

Till Man and Wife shall cease to live.

LOVE .

Consoling news!—Well, who 'd have thought
When you were snar'd, that I was caught!
That I—adept in shifting arts,
Was dup'd at last by constant hearts!
Had Friendship and Esteem been there,
Though late (for them ) I should not care.
But me, why me like prisoners guard?
I must complain—'tis very hard.

HUSBAND .

They cannot for their lives abscond:
We have their sureties in a bond.

LOVE .

What sureties, pray?

HUSBAND .

The heart—the mind,
Fast in those bonds, though unconfin'd.

LOVE .

Pray let me go!—in Beauty's charms,
I leave the bond of Cupid's arms.
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