Trimmer's Exercise

FOR THE USE OF CHILDREN .

Here, come, Master Timothy Todd,
 Before we have done you 'll look grimmer;
You 've been spelling some time for the rod,
 And your jacket shall know I 'm a Trimmer.

You don't know your A from your B,
 So backward you are in your Primer:
Don't kneel—you shall go on my knee,
 For I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

This morning you hindered the cook,
 By melting your dumps in the skimmer;
Instead of attending your book,—
 But I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

To-day, too, you went to the pond,
 And bathed, though you are not a swimmer;
And with parents so doting and fond—
 But I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

After dinner you went to the wine,
 And helped yourself—yes, to a brimmer;
You couldn't walk straight in a line,
 But I 'll make you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

You kick little Tomkins about,
 Because he is slighter and slimmer;
Are the weak to be thumped by the stout?
 But I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

Then you have a sly pilfering trick,
 Your school-fellows call you the nimmer,—
I will cut to the bone if you kick!
 For I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

To-day you made game at my back:
 You think that my eyes are grown dimmer,
But I watched you, I 've got a sly knack!
 And I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

Don't think that my temper is hot,
 It 's never beyond a slow simmer;
I 'll teach you to call me Dame Trot,
 But I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.

Miss Edgeworth, or Mrs. Chapone,
 Might melt to behold your tears glimmer;
Mrs. Barbauld would let you alone,
 But I 'll have you to know I 'm a Trimmer.
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