On a Very Nice Distinction between the Appetites and the Passions

ON A VERY NICE DISTINCTION BETWEEN THE APPETITES AND THE PASSIONS BY A METAPHYSICAL AND MORALIZING FEMALE, TO WHOM THE LINES ARE ADDRESSED .

Morality, your problem weigh'd,
Is of its principle afraid;
But, ere the links you part or join,
To each its proper task assign!
'Tis true that Hunger does not think,
And Passions neither eat nor drink.
But what 's a passion for a girl,
If Drury-lane bestows the pearl?
If taper legs pursuit invite,
Or naked bosoms tempt the sight?
I fear 'tis hunger at the best,
Though it prefers the meat undress'd;
Or if it 's taste those charms allure,
'Tis passion of an Epicure .
I own, when Antony was hurl'd
By that Egyptian from the world ,
His folly, thus matur'd with time,
Was more derang'd and more sublime;
But still I doubt of such pretences
To aristocratize the senses .
To my conceit the nuptial aim
Is a mask'd appetite for game , —
At least, I 'll answer for the man ,
His bride 's to him — an ortolan .
I own, when man, " the dear perfidious , "
Takes to his arms a vestal hideous;
Or when a damsel in her teens
With age is link'd behind the scenes;
'Tis passion more than appetite
That gives or takes the lover's right.
But when the heart, and senses too,
Their common favourite pursue —
When appetite , with passion join'd,
The taste and judgment have combin'd —
Love sweetly bound with Honour's chain,
The Virtues holding Beauty's train,
'Tis Reason, crowning Pleasure's birth,
It is — a Paradise on earth.
Yet, ere the links or flowers unite,
Let Miss beware of appetite!
Nor think, when passion gives the scent,
'Tis melted into sentiment .
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