Wrote in Answer to a Letter in Verse sent me by Mr. H. after having met Miss S. and me accidentally on the road and carry'd us to his Country House

Wrote in Answer to a Letter in Verse sent me by Mr. H. after having met Miss S. and me accidentally on the road and carry'd us to his Country House

He compar'd us to Venus and Pallas.

To Froyle the Muses sweetest seat
My Thanks I will express,
That with such tender care releiv'd
Poor damsels in distress.

In Ancient Time when Errant Knight
Some wand'ring Nymph did find,
He lightly leap'd from off his Steed
And set her up behind.

And while with Tears she told a Tale
Of strange Disastrous Fate
She quench'd her thirst from Limpid Streams
And Sallads were the Treat.

But You more hospitably kind
Receive the Stranger Guest,
Scarce knowing what or whence they were,
Unfreinded and undress'd.

While at a neat well furnish'd Board
You elegantly dine
You garnish out the rich repaste
With Music, Mirth, and Wine.

'Tis well for you no Goddesses
Conceal'd their heavenly Shapes
As once, 'tis said, they often did
In form of Mortal Trapes.

Celestial Dames, as Ovid sings
(Who was, you know, inspir'd),
Cannot bear Rivals upon Earth
And are with Envy fir'd.

Had Pallas seen the Loom at Froyle
And heard the sounding Lyre
She surely had the Canvas tore
And broke the Silver wire.

Venus no less enrag'd had view'd
Fair Amarillis' Youth,
She has not halfe so bright a Bloom
Nor such a melting Mouth.

But leaving these Heroic Strains
We beg you condescend
To bear the Filthy Town once more
And see your faithful Freind.
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