Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 4. Scene 4

ACT . IV. S CEN. IV.

Pyle, Elpidia.

Pyl . Now see you carry this as I have taught you,
And when I come to th' Throne I wil procure you
An Husband to your Mind; some Elder Brother
That wants some six or seven Grains of Wit,
Besides his ord'nary Allowance.
Elp . Truly
I never blab'd as yet you know; if they
Should offer but to question me, I would
Look sweetly on 'em, & forswear it strongly.

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 4. Scene 3

ACT . IV. S CEN. III.

Timophilus, Patacion, Cleodemus, Scedasus; They
are met by Eudemus .

Tim . Most opportunely met, Eudemus ; you
I know desire the common good, and never
Had a particular Interest that did
Run cross to that.
Eud . What is your Lordships meaning?
Cleo . If you'l preserve the Liberty of your City,
There is a way now profer'd you: Misander
Desires your Daughter.

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 4. Scene 2

ACT. IV. S CEN. II.

Pyle , and Prusias .

Pyl . You have no hopes then to be King?
Pru . My Title
Is but infirm to th' Crown, All the bloud Royall
That I have in me came by sucking of
His Majesties finger when he cut it once.
But for Nobility I've all the Signs of 't.
Pyl . You rate your looks, perhaps, have faces of
All prizes, pay your debts with Countenance:

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 4. Scene 1

ACT . IV. S CEN . I.

Phi . Though I am sorry for that great misfortune
Leucasia hath receiv'd, yet in respect
I come t' enjoy your Countenance by it.
I cannot wish't undone.
Pyl . It was a Judgment
From Heav'n upon her, cause she profer'd to
Ascend that Bed was only due to me.
Cal . I do confess your Vertues do deserve
Rule, and Dominion; but they'l shew as fair
And gracefull in Despising it, as e'r

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 3. Scene 7

ACT III. S CEN . VII.

Tim . Most Noble Citizens, 'tis very kindly
Done of you, thus to visit your faire Virgin.
Eud . Perhaps you think to complement us out
Of our revenge; where are your Swords? your Weapons?
Tim . There, in that Chair.
Eud . This meerly is a Plot.
Cle . I would Misander did dissemble only!
Alas! the Passion is too true. I wrong it

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 3. Scene 6

ACT . III. S CEN . VI.

Sced . What Policy is this and't please the Gods?
Ter . The sign o'th' Tyrant gazing on the Virgin.
Nic . Here's more work for my Pencill than my Sword.
Eud . What? stand you fix'd as he? I thought there would
Have been that loyall strife who should have first
Let out that Bloud that covets yours.
Epig . Shall we
Fight with a Statue?

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 3. Scene 5

ACT III. S CEN. V.

To him a Boy in the habit of a Virgin . Leucasia
discover'd in a Chair, and Euthalpe by her .

Mis. I know, for my sake, that she hates all Men;
Who're therfore Miserable 'cause she hates them.
So that I've brought a Curse o'r half the world
By this one single Action. Prethee sing,
And try if in this habit thou canst wooe
Her weary thoughts into a gentle slumber.

Song. Boy.

Seal up her Eyes, O Sleep, but flow

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 3. Scene 4

ACT III. S CEN. IV.

To him Cleodemus, Timophilus, Callimachus,
Philostratus .

Cle . Leave off this grief; The Citie's up in Arms Sir —
Mis . How does Leucasia ?
Tim . — They're almost with us — —
Phi . — Their March is swift; Eudemus is their Captain —
Cal . — They are resolv'd to kill, or to be kill'd —

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 3. Scene 3

ACT . III. S CEN. III.

Misander on a Couch.

Mis . Or Nature doth not make the Beautifull,
Or takes no care for their defence once made.
Where are those now say Beauty is a Guard
Sufficient without Weapons? Curs'd Misander :
Thou hast not that felicity of ill doing
As to offend the Common way. Thou dost
Act Crimes, that thwart receiv'd Opinions,
And contradict ev'n Truths agreed upon;
So that thy facts will be hereafter urg'd

Siege, The: Or, Love's Convert, A Tragi-Comedy - Act 3. Scene 2

ACT . III. S CEN. II.

To them Eudemus .

Eud . Not far off from thee most unhumane Tyrant.
Mis . I am a Tyrant now indeed; this stroke
Hath made that Name peculiarly mine.
Eud . Was't this she pleas'd thee for? she did deserve it
In comming to thee. 'Tis a due that's paid her
For that offence. But if I'd thought thou hadst
Only requir'd her Bloud 't should have been spilt

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